THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13

 

7:30 am – 2:00 pm

REGISTRATION

LOCATION: Hotel Lobby

SPONSORED BY:
Prince Rupert

 


7:30 – 8:30 AM

WELCOME COFFEE & TEA

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 


8:45 – 9:00 am

WELCOMING REMARKS

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I

Greg Knowler
Asia Editor,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 


9:00 – 9:45 AM

CHINA’S SLOWDOWN —
HOW SHOULD SHIPPERS RESPOND?

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I

China’s adjustment from an export manufacturing powerhouse to a service and consumption-led economy has multiple impacts on regional and global cargo transportation and supply chain networks. An inevitable downside to becoming a middle income economy, China continues to lose competitiveness in the production of lower-end goods for export, and is instituting policies aimed at shifting its focus to higher-value industries. As a result, industrial sectors that are growing today are different to those that were growing 10 years ago. In addition, winners and losers are emerging among China’s major industrial regions with some, including the Northeast, increasingly struggling while others will continue to thrive. With internationalization policies such as One Belt, One Road, China’s leadership is seeking to strengthen its relationships with the rest of Asia and beyond to create stronger markets for Chinese-made products and secure sources of raw materials. This session will look at a changing China, including the latest on new growth sectors and regions, and the impact of trends such as rising consumption and One Belt, One Road on the domestic, regional and global cargo transportation and supply chain landscape.

— SESSION CHAIR —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor,
Global Ports,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELIST —
Brian Jackson
Senior Economist,
IHS Beijing

 


9:45 – 10:30 AM

CHINA’S SLOWDOWN —
WHAT DOES THE DATA SHOW?

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I

A deep dive into China’s shipper data to explore production trends, trade flows, import-export orders, the implications of the country’s slowing GDP.

— SESSION CHAIR —
Greg Knowler
Asia Editor,
IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELIST —
Michael Looten
Director Maritime,
Seabury

 


10:30 – 11:00 AM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 


11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

RISING ASEAN —
WHAT IT MEANS FOR INTRA-ASIA TRADE

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I

Southeast Asia continues to take a greater share of global manufacturing from China as companies increasingly seek new source markets because of the complexities of sourcing only in China. Steadily rising wages, labor shortages and improving social policies that add to the payroll are erasing cost advantages of producing goods in the country and causing retailers to adjust their strategies, using China as a hub and adding manufacturing centers in other countries. This has led to incredible growth in production in some countries. Electronics output in Vietnam, for example, has soared from $6.9 billion in 2011 to $45.8 billion last year. Coupled with rising production are local factors across Southeast Asian economies as a fast-growing middle class drives economic activity and stimulates trade between countries. So what does this mean for intra-Asia trade and the shippers sourcing in the region? It means more containerized cargo volumes moving around the region and a rash of new intra-Asia services and mainline feeder connections, with growing doubts about ports’ ability to handle them. Where are the congestion hot spots in the intra-Asia trade and what is being done to improve those ports? Will congestion surcharges become a fixture on the trade? Will larger vessels cascading down from the east-west trades add to the regional capacity and keep downward pressure on rates?

— SESSION CHAIR —
Lian Hoon Lim
Managing Director,
AlixPartners

— PANELIST —
Gary So
Deputy Managing Director,
Kerry Logistics Network

Tim Wickmann
CEO,
MCC Transport

 


12:00 – 1:00 PM

NETWORKING LUNCH

LOCATION: TBD

 


1:00 – 2:30 PM

CHINA’S CROSS-BORDER TRADE —
ADJUSTING TO THE E-COMMERCE PHENOMENON

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I

The link between rising consumption and online sales is becoming the most important source of growth in Asia’s cargo transportation and logistics industry. Industry executives correctly believe that, more than anything else, e-commerce is changing the way goods are connected to consumers. But they’re also unsure how to position themselves to benefit from the opportunities of this change. They struggle to create a picture of what the goods transportation landscape in Asia will look like in five to 10 years as a result of the e-commerce phenomenon and fear the impact of disrupters. While e-commerce expands throughout the region, China leads developing Asia in terms of policy to nurture the sector and this policy is increasingly shaping the dominant e-commerce supply chain models that are emerging. The overall goal is to foster development of supply chains that use modern facilities and improved technological systems to better integrate retail, trade and logistics services for fast and efficient distribution that includes the provision of cross-border e-commerce-related services such as quality checks, cost-effective handling of returned items, and efficient and robust compliance management. The session will examine how e-commerce is changing the way goods are connected with consumers in Asia.

— SESSION CHAIR —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor,
Global Ports,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
James Chang
Chief Operating Officer,
Lazada Crossborder

Kara Cheung
Managing Partner,
KCW and Associates

James Gagne
CEO,
SEKO Logistics

 


2:30 – 3:30 PM

E-COMMERCE IN A NEW ERA —
THE ALIBABA-AMAZON EFFECT

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I

— SESSION CHAIR —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor,
Global Ports,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

 


3:30 PM

CLOSING REMARKS

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I