Tuesday, June 14, 2016

7:00 AM – 3:30 PM

REGISTRATION

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom Foyer

 


7:30 – 8:15 AM

Networking Breakfast

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom Foyer

 


8:15 – 8:45 AM

Opening Remarks

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom

Joe Bonney
SENIOR EDITOR,
BREAKBULK AND PROJECT CARGO,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce
and JOC Events,
IHS Maritime & Trade

Roger Guenther
Executive Director,
Port of Houston Authority

 


8:45 – 9:45 AM

OPENING ROUNDTABLE —
A SHIPPER-CARRIER DISCUSSION OF THE GULF’S FUTURE AS A CONTAINER GATEWAY

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom

The U.S. Gulf has been on the sidelines in the great migration of Asia cargo from the U.S. West Coast to the East Coast as shippers have sought to avoid longshore labor unrest and maximize the use of ocean transportation to serve consumers in the U.S. Southeast. But with Texas growing strongly, with the Panama Canal expansion finally complete and with shippers as skeptical as ever about West Coast routings due to the months-long 2014-15 ILWU disruption, Gulf ports have an opening to capture a larger share of U.S.-Asia containerized trade. The growth of key commodities such as resins and expanded rail options will only support the Gulf’s position as a competitive gateway. This roundtable discussion including shippers and carriers will explore all aspects of the Gulf’s potential as a viable and competitive U.S. container gateway. What does the Gulf have to do to maximize its potential? What obstacles does it have to overcome? What are its biggest challenges and opportunities?

— Session Chair —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content
IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELISTS —
Tony Davis
Executive Vice President of
Distribution and Logistics,
Academy Sports

Soren Egholm
VICE PRESIDENT OF TRADE & MARKETING,
MAERSK LINE NORTH AMERICA

Perry Padden
Americas Logistics & Distribution Manager,
ExxonMobil Chemical Company

Allen Clifford
Executive Vice President,
Mediterranean Shipping Co.

 


9:45 – 10:45 AM

MARKET OUTLOOK —
ANALYZING THE GULF’S OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom
In what can only be described as a disappointing year for U.S. ports as a whole — with overall containerized trade eking out mere 0.8 percent growth — U.S. Gulf ports excelled. Some of the largest container ports in the region registered some of the strongest gains in containerized volumes among North American ports, led by New Orleans’ 10.6 percent gain and Houston’s 9 percent growth, according to data from PIERS, a sister product of The Journal of Commerce within IHS that provides containerized import-export data. Smaller container ports grew even more rapidly, including Tampa, which saw a 20 percent surge and Freeport, Texas, which grew 15.5 percent. Although much of the growth at Gulf ports is attributed to diversions from the West Coast related to disruption resulting from protracted 2014-15 longshore labor talks, Gulf ports are holding onto much of the business that came their way. Now, there are new growth drivers in play. The Panama Canal will debut its new, expanded locks in late June, opening the door to much larger container and multipurpose ships. And a booming petrochemical industry is producing large quantities of resin exports. The world’s two largest ocean carriers — Maersk Line and Mediterranean Shipping — in May started new weekly all-water trans-Pacific services through the Panama Canal to Houston and Mobile, and more new services are expected to follow. The problem is, it all may be too much of a good thing. Are Gulf ports prepared for the huge demand the resins business will generate? Can the port- and landside infrastructure handle it, and, if not, what options do producers have. This session will analyze the outlook for growth in shipments through the Gulf and how prepared the region is to handle it.

SPONSORED BY:
APM

— INTRODUCED BY —
Brian Harold
Managing Director,
APM Terminals, Mobile, Alabama

— Session Chair —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor, JOC.com,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —
Mario Moreno
Senior Economist,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

Brian Fielkow
CEO,
Jetco Delivery

 


10:45 – 11:15 AM

Networking Coffee Break

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom Foyer

SPONSORED BY:
JETCO

 


11:15 AM- 12:00 PM

THE RESINS BOOM —
AN ANALYSIS OF THE GULF’S NEXT BIG GROWTH DRIVER

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom

With ExxonMobil, Chevron Phillips 66, Dow Chemical and other large multinational companies pumping billions of dollars into massive new petrochemical plants, Gulf ports are racing to prepare for the huge amount of new containerized trade coming their way in the form of resins and other plastics products. In Texas alone, new petrochemical plants could generate more than 500,000 TEUs a year by 2020 — equivalent to a quarter of Houston’s total containerized trade in 2015. How will the ports handle this surge? Will other carriers follow Maersk and MSC with services through the Gulf to capitalize on these new containerized cargoes? What infrastructure improvements must occur and what projects do ports have underway? This session will analyze the huge opportunities — and challenges — the petrochemical boom presents U.S. Gulf ports.

SPONSORED BY:
Pinch

— INTRODUCED BY —
Brooks Elliott
Vice President of Business Development,
Pinch Intermodal

— Session Chair —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content
IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELIST —
Joel Morales
Jr., Director,
Polyolefins Americas,
IHS Chemical

 


12:00 – 1:00 PM

Networking Lunch

LOCATION: The Lounge, 2nd Floor

 


1:00 – 2:00 PM

INTERMODAL RAIL —
WILL THE GULF EXTEND ITS REACH?

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom

Intermodal rail connections to Gulf Coast ports are pivotal in the ports’ efforts to serve not just their surrounding regions, but also to attract discretionary cargoes heading to and from as far north as Chicago. But the massive networks of BNSF Railway and Union Pacific Railroad that connect to U.S. West Coast ports pose a steep challenge to Gulf Coast ports’ drive toward the heartland. Railroad executives, shippers and analysts will get down-and-dirty with transit time and cost comparisons on both routes, giving attendees a clear picture of what cargo makes sense to move north-south and when the east-west routing still wins.

— Session Chair —
Reynolds Hutchins
Associate Editor,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —
Edward Zaninelli
President,
Griffin Creek Consulting

Dan Bresolin
Assistant Vice President of
International Intermodal,
Canadian National Railway

Bruce Abbe
Executive Director,
Midwest Shippers Association

 


2:00 – 3:00 PM

CUBA — A NEW FRONTIER

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom

The excitement over the warming relations between the U.S. and Cuba has been replaced with a clear-eyed understanding of just how much more must be done in order to allow free containerized trade between the two countries. But after decades of salivating over the full opening of the Cuba market for U.S. export and imports, Gulf Coast ports, container lines and shippers are preparing to capitalize on the day when Congress gives the go-ahead. This session will detail the opportunities and challenges the Cuba market provides.

— Session Chair —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor, JOC.com,
IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELISTS —
Jay Brickman
Vice President of Government Services,
Crowley Maritime

Dr. Parr Rosson
Professor and Department Head,
Department of Agricultural Economics,
Texas A&M University

Ernest Bezdek
Director of Trade Development,
Port of Beaumont

 


3:00 – 3:30 PM

Networking Coffee Break

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom Foyer

SPONSORED BY:ASPA

 


3:30 – 4:30 PM

HEAVY-LIFT MARKET OUTLOOK —
IS A TURNAROUND IN SIGHT?

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom

Breakbulk and heavy-lift cargoes are important parts of the cargo mix at Gulf ports. The region is the top U.S. gateway for steel and energy-related shipments, and handles large volumes of other uncontainerized cargoes such as forest products, metals and natural rubber. Although shipments of energy-related projects continue, the oil price slump is having an impact. Other breakbulk commodities including steel also have been roiled by market trends. What’s the outlook? This session will explore market developments and provide insights into what to expect.

— Session Chair —
Joe Bonney
SENIOR EDITOR,
BREAKBULK AND PROJECT CARGO,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— Panelists —
Edwin Bastian
Global Sales Director,
BBC Chartering USA

Jarl Pedersen
Chief Commercial Officer,
Port Corpus Christi Authority

Graham McIntyre
Senior Sales Executive,
Global Forwarding,
C.H. Robinson Worldwide

Elroy Griggs
Traffic and Logistics Manager,
Bechtel Oil, Gas & Chemicals

 


4:30 – 5:30 PM

PORT PERSPECTIVES —
A DISCUSSION WITH GULF PORT LEADERS

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom

With expanded Panama Canal locks finally a reality, Gulf ports are preparing for changes. In what promises to be an informative and enlightening wrap-up session, the CEOs and directors of some of the largest Gulf ports will discuss market developments, how their ports are preparing for the expanded canal and other changes, and what they see for the years ahead.

— Session Chair —
Joe Bonney
SENIOR EDITOR,
BREAKBULK AND PROJECT CARGO,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
Paul Anderson
President and CEO,
Port Tampa Bay

Roger Guenther
Executive Director,
Port of Houston Authority

James K. Lyons
Director and CEO,
Alabama State Port Authority

Matt Gresham
Director of External Affairs,
Port of New Orleans

 


5:30 – 7:00 PM

Hospitality Reception

LOCATION: Magnolia Ballroom Foyer

SPONSORED BY:sponsor