WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2016

 

DAY 2 — THE MAIN EVENT

If Tuesday afternoon was the appetizer, Wednesday is the main course. Starting with a keynote address by FedEx Freight’s Michael L. Ducker, Day 2 of the Inland Distribution Conference will get to the heart of the issues confronting shippers and their transportation service providers through a mix of single speakers, roundtable-type discussions and formal presentations.


7:00 AM – 5:30 PM

REGISTRATION

LOCATION: TBD

SPONSORED BY:
IMC

 


7:30 – 8:30 AM

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

LOCATION: Networking Area

 


8:30 – 9:00 AM

WELCOMING REMARKS

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

William Cassidy
Senior Editor,
Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 


9:00 – 9:45 AM

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

Michael L. Ducker took the wheel at the largest U.S. trucking company in January 2015, just as the freight economy peaked and the West Coast ports labor dispute disrupted supply chains. Like his predecessor, Bill Logue, Ducker brought decades of experience with FedEx Express in the U.S. and overseas to his less-than-truckload leadership role. Ducker is also chairman of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which gives him a supply chain-wide perspective on U.S. business and the global economy. Bringing freight shipping into the digital age with rapidly evolving technologies is a key challenge he sees on the road ahead. Ducker will offer his insights on the state of the market and the future trucking and freight supply chains in this wide-ranging and highly anticipated discussion.

— INTRODUCED BY —
William Cassidy
Senior Editor,
Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

— FEATURED SPEAKER —
Michael L. Ducker
President and CEO,
FedEx Freight

 


9:45 – 10:45 AM

THE ROAD AHEAD —
ANALYZING THE TRUCKING AND INTERMODAL LANDSCAPE

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

For shippers and transportation providers alike, the past few years have been a wild ride with plenty of unexpected turns. Tight truck capacity and intermodal gains in 2014 transformed into excess capacity, high inventories and intermodal pains by early 2016. The steep drop in oil and fuel prices in 2015 sent shockwaves across supply chains of all types, as did the strong U.S. dollar. All signs point to more interesting times in 2017. We dodged the “mother of all capacity shortages” as the economy softened, but will it come back in 2017? Will diesel prices rise? Will truck capacity tighten as inventory is drawn down? Will freight rates start rising again? There are dozens of questions on issues affecting shippers and carriers we’ll discuss in this panel.

— SESSION CHAIR —
Reynolds Hutchins
Associate Editor,
Intermodal and Government/Regulation,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELIST —
Page Siplon
Chief Executive Officer,
TeamOne Logistics

 


10:45 – 11:15 AM

NETWORKING BREAK

LOCATION: Networking Area

SPONSORED BY:
Laufer

 


11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

SHIPPER-CARRIER PERSPECTIVES —
A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION WITH INDUSTRY STAKEHOLDERS

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

Is the U.S. in a freight recession? That was the question The Journal of Commerce asked early this year as transportation executives wrestled with high shipper inventories and lackluster growth in domestic and international freight volumes. Whether freight is in a true recession — with volumes showing repeated quarterly declines — is debatable and certainly mixed. total U.S. carload traffic, for example, declined 6.1 percent in 2015, to 14.3 million, according to the Intermodal Association of North America, led by a steep 12 percent fall in coal traffic. Intermodal traffic, consisting of containers and trailers, fared better, inching up 1.6 percent. That was largely the story for trucking too, where tonnage increased about 2.6 percent year-over-year, according to the American Trucking Associations. With the exception of continued weakness in carload traffic, 2016 got off a faster start. On the international side, containerized ocean imports spiked some 7 percent in the first quarter, helping to feed containerized intermodal shipments. And a strong March led a first-quarter increase of 3.9 percent in truck tonnage, according to the ATA, But retailers and other shippers are struggling to draw down inventories, and in some cases, may not want to because of consumers’ increasing shift to e-commerce and the rapid delivery from centralized distribution centers it requires. As a result, carriers across modes are flush with capacity and face pricing headwinds. So how do shippers and carriers see the market as 2016 winds down and what do they anticipate for 2017? This roundtable discussion among trucking, rail and logistics executives and their customers will provide context to the market indicators laid out in the preceding panel of analysts, while gauging the mind-set of industry stakeholders themselves as 2017 approaches.

— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, IHS Maritime & Trade

 


12:15 – 1:15 PM

NETWORKING LUNCH

LOCATION: Networking Area

Join your colleagues in this hourlong break from the program, featuring a mix of seating options allowing you to stand, sit or walk the floor. Visit with your customers at surrounding sponsored tabletops and reconnect with friends and business partners while recharging your batteries for an afternoon of in-depth conference programming.

SPONSORED BY:
KCS

 


1:15 – 2:00 PM

DIGESTING THE ELECTION —
WHAT WASHINGTON’S NEW MAKEUP MEANS FOR FREIGHT INTERESTS

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

Leave your punditry outside for this business-focused review of what a Clinton or Trump administration will mean for shippers and the transportation providers that serve them. Will the new president ease the gas on trucking regulation? Will the White House and Congress finally get serious about freight infrastructure funding? And with anti-trade talk on both sides of the aisle, what’s the implication for the North American Free Trade Agreement and the cross-border shippers who depend on it? We’ll discuss these and other election-related issues in the first of two intertwined sessions.

— PANELIST —
Randy Mullett
Principal,
Mullett Strategies

 


2:00 – 3:00 PM

THE REGULATORY LANDSCAPE —
HOW TO COMPLY WITHOUT SUFFERING PRICING SHOCK

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

Already grappling with tight margins, shippers and their motor carriers face a minefield of potential regulatory costs. Trucking companies will absorb some of the additional costs from regulations, ranging from electronic logging devices and tighter truck emission standards, but much in the way of costs will be passed onto shippers. And driver coercion rules expand the financial risk of non-compliance and misdeeds to the shipper. How shippers and transportation providers prepare and cooperate with each other will determine whether the cost of regulation is a manageable incline or a series of unexpected nasty shocks. This session, the second of two policy-centric discussions, will analyze the risks of non-compliance and best practices to meet federal mandates cost-effectively.

— SESSION CHAIR —
Reynolds Hutchins
Associate Editor,
Intermodal and Government/Regulation,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELIST —
Brian Fielkow
President,
Jetco Delivery

Randy Mullett
Principal,
Mullett Strategies

 


3:00 – 3:30 PM

NETWORKING BREAK

LOCATION: Networking Area

 


3:30 – 4:30 PM

EQUIPMENT DISLOCATION —
THE CONTAINER-TRAILER-CHASSIS CONUNDRUM

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

Securing the right equipment at a competitive price is a major challenge at many inland locations. The reality is that there are hubs with surplus containers, trailers and chassis, and there are deficit locations. Transporting equipment from surplus locations to where they’re needed the most is a costly proposition, but there are ways around this conundrum. Industry experts will relate proven strategies for linking importers and exporters within a region to reduce container repositioning costs through matchbacks and street turns. Creative lease arrangements and purchase options also are available to help shippers deal with chassis shortages and dislocations.

— SESSION CHAIR —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor, West Coast,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELISTS —
Edward Zaninelli
President,
Griffin Creek Consulting

Steve Rubin
CEO,
ITS Technologies & Logistics

Michael Simonanis
Director of North America Logistics,
Louis Dreyfus Co.

 


3:30 – 5:00 PM

STUDENT SESSION
THE WORKFORCE OF THE FUTURE —
RAISING THE VISIBILITY OF LOGISTICS AS A CAREER

LOCATION: Concurrent Workshop (Continental Ballroom)

It’s one of the industry’s largest quandaries: How to replace the talent that will be exiting the industry as an increasing number of Baby Boomers retire over the next decade? Although more colleges and universities are including logistics and transportation programs in their degreed curricula, many would question whether the industry’s profile is high enough to today’s youth to fill the employment demand to come. This special workshop will feature presentations and conversation from industry leaders to a group of Memphis-area high school students — i.e., your potential future employees — on the merits of logistics as a career.

— INTRODUCED BY —
Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELIST —
Stephanie Ivey
Associate Professor and
Director of the Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute,
University of Memphis

 


4:30 – 5:30 PM

CROSSING THE BORDER —
WHAT’S DRIVING NAFTA TRADE?

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A&B)

Global trade may be growing at a slow pace, but you wouldn’t know that at U.S. border entry ports. Cross-border freight volumes are rising in Laredo, Texas, the largest U.S.-Mexican border crossing for trucks, and in Detroit, the largest truck crossing on the Canadian border. NAFTA’s cross-border freight growth of 3.2 percent in 2015 — representing 14.7 million truck and rail containers crossing both borders — exceeds the global ocean containerized trade’s weak gain of 1.3 percent in the same period. Driving that cross-border growth is record demand for cars and light trucks in the U.S., a shift in global shipper supply chain strategies that favors Mexican ports and manufacturing, and U.S. exchange rates with the Canadian dollar and Mexican peso that give a strong advantage to companies manufacturing goods in both countries for export to the U.S. The dynamism in the face of slowing global economic growth to backers reflects the strength of the two-decade-old North American Free Trade Agreement, which today finds itself in the crosshairs of presidential election rhetoric. This panel will analyze the trends in cross-border trade and the future of relations between the longtime NAFTA partners.

— SESSION CHAIRS —
William Cassidy
Senior Editor,
Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELIST —
Allison J. Watson
Marketing and Sales,
General Director Market &
Product Development,
Union Pacific Railroad

Jordan Dewart
President,
Yusen Logistics Mexico

 


5:30 – 7:00 PM

NETWORKING RECEPTION

LOCATION: Networking Area

Before heading out for the evening, network with new colleagues and reconnect with others in this 90-minute reception.

SPONSORED BY:
Centerpoint